Archive:Spring 2005 Policy Paper

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This is our external policy papers for legislators for spring 2005. If you're looking for our Spring_2005_Strategy_Paper, it's not here.

Introduction

We are for a vibrant, open culture that people can freely draw on to build upon. We believe that free enterprise strives upon open access. We are against the use of technology to subvert competition in the free market. We support democratic forms of distribution.

Key Points

  • One like PK's first:
    • "Ensuring that U.S. intellectual property law and policy reflect the "cultural bargain" intended by the framers of the constitution: providing an incentive to creators and innovators while benefiting the public through the free flow of information and ideas."
    • Making efforts to restore the balance in the copyright regime such as was intended in the Progress clause of the US constitution through promoting the free flow of information and facilitating technological innovation.
      • NOTE: The two are not mutually exclusive. Many people seem to think this is the case. Perhaps we should expand upon this.
  • Academic freedom - innovation and growth depend on research, which must be able to be carried out unhindered. Academic research depends on open access to information. Our nation is dependent upon innovation and research.
  • We believe in the Betamax decision. New technology with substantial non-infringing uses should be allowed to develop and contribute to the ability of individuals to participate in culture. Any attempt to stifle such development and innovation could result in far-reaching negative consequences for the future of technology.
    • Question of how to define the "substantial" aspect; this will likely be considered in the Grokster decision.
  • We oppose abuse of the legislative process solely to protect the interests and outmoded profit models of established industries who refuse to adapt to new technologies or make changes to embrace them.
  • Any public works produced by the government should be freely and openly available to all citizens.