Difference between revisions of "Free Culture Manifesto"

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The mission of the Free Culture movement is to build a bottom-up, participatory structure to society and culture, rather than a top-down, closed, proprietary structure.
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The mission of the Free Culture movement is to build a bottom-up, participatory structure to society and culture, rather than a top-down, closed, proprietary structure. Through the democratizing power of digital technology and the Internet, we can place the tools of creation and distribution, communication and collaboration, teaching and learning into the hands of the common person -- and with a truly active, connected, informed citizenry, injustice and oppression will slowly but surely vanish from the earth. 
  
We believe that culture should be a two-way affair, about participation, not just consumption. Through the democratizing power of digital technology and the Internet, the tools of creation and distribution, communication and collaboration are available to everyone. With these tools, anyone can participate. We can build a more open, more diverse, richer culture ''improving artistic expression, entertainment, education, and politics.'' (or ''leading to a freer, better educated, more active world.'') We will not sit at the end of a one-way media tube.
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We believe that culture should be a two-way affair, about participation, not merely consumption. We will not sit at the end of a one-way media tube. With the Internet and other advances, the technology exists for a new paradigm of creation, one where anyone can be an artist, and anyone can succeed, based not on their industry connections, but on their merit.
  
The freedom to build upon the past is necessary for creativity and innovation to thrive. We will use and promote our cultural heritage in the public domain ''and the commons''. We will make, share, adapt, and promote open content. We will listen to free music, contemplate at free art, watch free film, and read free books. All the while, we will contribute, discuss, annotate, critique, improve, improvise, remix, mutate, and add yet more ingredients into the soup of our common culture. We will help everyone understand the value of our cultural wealth, promoting free software and the open-source model.
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We refuse to accept a future of digital feudalism where we do not actually own the products we buy, but we are merely granted limited uses of them as long as we pay the rent. We must halt and reverse the recent radical expansion of intellectual property rights, which threaten to reach the point where they trump any and all other rights of the individual and society.
  
We reject a future of digital feudalism where we do not actually own the products we buy, but we are instead granted limited use of them as long as we pay the rent. We believe technology should be used to empower, not restrict our abilities. We will oppose monitoring devices that will prevent users from having control of their own machines and their own data.
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The freedom to build upon the past is necessary for creativity and innovation to thrive. We will use and promote our cultural heritage in the public domain. We will make, share, adapt, and promote open content. We will listen to free music, look at free art, watch free film, and read free books. All the while, we will contribute, discuss, annotate, critique, improve, improvise, remix, mutate, and add yet more ingredients into the free culture soup.
  
We will halt and reverse the recent radical expansion of copyright, which threatens education, critique, creativity, and innovation. ''Patents? e.g. "We will oppose software patents, which radically re-interpret the concept of "mechanical inventions," dangerously expanding the scope of patentable creations and threatening the open source model."'' We will resist repressive legislation which threatens our civil liberties and stifles innovation.
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We will help everyone understand the value of our cultural wealth, promoting free software and the open-source model. We will resist repressive legislation which threatens our civil liberties and stifles innovation. We will oppose hardware-level monitoring devices that will prevent users from having control of their own machines and their own data.
  
We won't allow copyright holders to cling to obsolete modes of distribution through bad legislation and industry protectionism. We will be active participants in a free culture of connectivity and production, made possible as never before, and we will fight to prevent this new potential from being locked down by corporate or legislative control. If we allow new, participatory technologies to be twisted to enforce the interests of the few who control culture today at the expense of the many, we will have lost something beautiful, revolutionary, and irretrievable.
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We won't allow the content industry to cling to obsolete modes of distribution through bad legislation. We will be active participants in a free culture of connectivity and production, made possible as it never was before by the Internet and digital technology, and we will fight to prevent this new potential from being locked down by corporate and legislative control. If we allow the bottom-up, participatory structure of the Internet to be twisted into a glorified cable TV service -- if we allow the established paradigm of creation and distribution to reassert itself -- then the window of opportunity opened by the Internet will have been closed, and we will have lost something beautiful, revolutionary, and irretrievable.
  
Citizens should have access to the works of their government. Scientists should be able to study how software and technology operate. Everyone should have the right to free expression
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The future is in our hands; we must build a technological and cultural movement to defend the digital commons.
 
 
The future is in our hands: we must organize to defend our common cultural heritage.
 
  
 
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Version 1.2.4
  
''This document was adapted from the [http://scdc.sccs.swarthmore.edu/ Swarthmore Coalition for the Digital Commons] manifesto.
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''This document was adapted from the [http://scdc.sccs.swarthmore.edu Swarthmore Coalition for the Digital Commons] manifesto. Edits after 1.0 are provisional until adopted by the Free Culture core.''

Revision as of 05:20, 12 February 2005

The mission of the Free Culture movement is to build a bottom-up, participatory structure to society and culture, rather than a top-down, closed, proprietary structure. Through the democratizing power of digital technology and the Internet, we can place the tools of creation and distribution, communication and collaboration, teaching and learning into the hands of the common person -- and with a truly active, connected, informed citizenry, injustice and oppression will slowly but surely vanish from the earth.

We believe that culture should be a two-way affair, about participation, not merely consumption. We will not sit at the end of a one-way media tube. With the Internet and other advances, the technology exists for a new paradigm of creation, one where anyone can be an artist, and anyone can succeed, based not on their industry connections, but on their merit.

We refuse to accept a future of digital feudalism where we do not actually own the products we buy, but we are merely granted limited uses of them as long as we pay the rent. We must halt and reverse the recent radical expansion of intellectual property rights, which threaten to reach the point where they trump any and all other rights of the individual and society.

The freedom to build upon the past is necessary for creativity and innovation to thrive. We will use and promote our cultural heritage in the public domain. We will make, share, adapt, and promote open content. We will listen to free music, look at free art, watch free film, and read free books. All the while, we will contribute, discuss, annotate, critique, improve, improvise, remix, mutate, and add yet more ingredients into the free culture soup.

We will help everyone understand the value of our cultural wealth, promoting free software and the open-source model. We will resist repressive legislation which threatens our civil liberties and stifles innovation. We will oppose hardware-level monitoring devices that will prevent users from having control of their own machines and their own data.

We won't allow the content industry to cling to obsolete modes of distribution through bad legislation. We will be active participants in a free culture of connectivity and production, made possible as it never was before by the Internet and digital technology, and we will fight to prevent this new potential from being locked down by corporate and legislative control. If we allow the bottom-up, participatory structure of the Internet to be twisted into a glorified cable TV service -- if we allow the established paradigm of creation and distribution to reassert itself -- then the window of opportunity opened by the Internet will have been closed, and we will have lost something beautiful, revolutionary, and irretrievable.

The future is in our hands; we must build a technological and cultural movement to defend the digital commons.


Version 1.2.4

This document was adapted from the Swarthmore Coalition for the Digital Commons manifesto. Edits after 1.0 are provisional until adopted by the Free Culture core.